Recent Changes

Tuesday, May 5

  1. page Stem 2 edited Plant Stems!!! Node- Node uninsulated spaces ... be transmitted. Internode- Internode …

    Plant Stems!!!
    Node-Node uninsulated spaces
    ...
    be transmitted.
    Internode-

    Internode
    the portions
    ...
    the nodes
    Bud-undeveloped

    Budundeveloped
    shoot of
    ...
    plant
    Vascular Bundle-Bundle separate strands
    ...
    of plants
    Pith-soft

    Pithsoft
    spongelike central
    ...
    flowering plants
    Primary Growth- Growth

    Primary GrowthGrowth
    in vascular
    ...
    growth.
    Secondary Growth-Growth Growth in
    Vascular cambium- A lateral meristem that produces secondary xylem to the inside and secondary phloem to the outside.
    Cork Cambium- A lateral ring of meristematic tissue found in woody seed plants, producing cork on the outside of the ring and parenchyma on the inside of the ring. Also called phellogen.
    Heartwood- The older, nonliving central wood of a tree or woody plant, usually darker and harder than the younger sapwood. Also called duramen.
    Sapwood-The newly formed outer wood located just inside the vascular cambium of a tree trunk and active in the conduction of water. Sapwood is usually lighter in color than heartwood.
    Bark-.Bark The tough
    ...
    vascular cambium.
    Questions
    1. How do the functions of a stem relate to those of the roots and leaves of a plant?
    Stems can easily relate to the roots' main function: transport. The stem's vascular tubes intercept nutrients, water, and carbohydrates that have been absorbed by the roots and transport them further throughout the plant.
    2. Describe how the arrangement of vascular bundles differs between monocot and dicot stems.
    In a monocot angiosperm, vascular bundles are arranged in a scattered, disorderly manner throughout the stem. In dicot angiosperms, vascular bundles are gathered in a circular ring the border the inside walls of the stem.
    3. When European settlers were struggling to clear heavily wooded land in North America, they often girdled large trees by removing a strip of bark all the way around the base of the tree. Why would this cause the tree to die?
    When the tree's lower bark is removed, the tissue that is located outside of the vascular cambium is destroyed, cutting off nutrient and water sources for the tree.

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    8:20 am

Monday, May 4

  1. page Stems 1 edited 1.The main functions of the stem of a plant are to transport water and food, to provide structure,…
    1.The main functions of the stem of a plant are to transport water and food, to provide structure, and to get the leaves to sun light for photosynthesis.
    2. The protective epidermis encloses the stem. The cortex tissues provide support and act as food storage.
    3.A monocot is a herbaceous plant with with randomly scattered vascular bundles. A dicot is a herbaceous plant with vascular bundles that form a ring around the pith.
    4. herbacious stems are meant for supporting a flower but not for sustaining a longer life. a woody stem is meant for sustaining a longer life but not necessarily for flowery growth.
    5.Primary growth is when the plant grows upward. Secondary growth is when the plant grows out.
    6.We couldn't fond a good picture, sorry =(
    7.Each ring represents a year, and the size of the ring shows how much growth the tree had that year.
    8.Bark forms by. It pro
    9.

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    9:23 am
  2. page Leaves & Transport 2 edited ... 7. Adhesion- the ability to water can stay in the plant 8. Capillary Action- the attraction o…
    ...
    7. Adhesion- the ability to water can stay in the plant
    8. Capillary Action- the attraction of water molecules to soil particles.
    {Parts_of_a_Leaf.jpg} Water is transported through a plant through the shoots system. Xylem is responsible for transporting water.
    .

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    9:20 am
  3. page Vocabulary 1 edited ... flower - growth from an angiosperm which helps transport pollen stamen - organ of a flower th…
    ...
    flower - growth from an angiosperm which helps transport pollen
    stamen - organ of a flower that bears pollen grains.
    carpel - the complete female reproductive organ
    endosperm - the tissue that develops as a food supply
    fruit - the over ripened ovary
    sepal - protects flower before it opens
    petal - attraction
    anther - produces pollen
    embryo sac - the mature female gametophyte of a flowering plant
    style - long thin stalk of pistil
    stigma - sticky top of style where pollen lands and germinates

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    9:15 am

Friday, May 1

  1. page Roots 1 edited ... storage. {root_diagram.gif} The The taking-in of {Ferticell_Diagram.png} T Nitr…

    ...
    storage. {root_diagram.gif} The
    The
    taking-in of
    {Ferticell_Diagram.png}
    TNitrogen, potassium, calcium, phosphorus, magnesium, sulfur and silicon are essential plant nutrents. Without the essential nutrients a plant wouldn't grow or complete a full plant life cycle.
    A meristem is the tissue in all plants consisting of undifferentiated cells (meristematic cells) and found in zones of the plant where growth can take place. A Root uses these tissues in order to grow.
    MONOCOTS
    DICOTS
    seeds with single cotyledon
    seeds with two cotyledons
    Flower parts in multiples of three
    Flower parts in multiples of four or five
    parallel leaf venation
    netlike leaf venation
    Stem vacular bundles scattered
    Stem vascular bundles in a ring
    fibrous roots
    taproots
    ex. wheat, corn, rice, oats
    ex. roses, dasies
    Taproot: a main root descending downward from the radicle and giving off small lateral roots.
    Fibrous Root: a root system that consists of very fine branches.
    Cortex: the portion of a stem between the epidermis and the vascular tissue; bark.
    Root Hair: an elongated tubular extension of an epidermal cell of a root, serving to absorb water and minerals from the soil
    Endodermis: a specialized tissue in the roots and stems of vascular plants, composed of a single layer of modified parenchyma cells forming the inner boundary of the cortex.
    Root Cap: A thimble-shaped mass of cells that covers and protects the root tip.

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    7:56 am

Thursday, April 30

  1. page Vocabulary 2 edited ... Phloem- Transports organic material up in a plant Ground Tissue- Where photosynthesis takes p…
    ...
    Phloem- Transports organic material up in a plant
    Ground Tissue- Where photosynthesis takes place
    Meristem- Group of activly dividing plant cells
    Apical Meristem- Responsible for vertical growth
    Primary Growth- Growing Vertically
    Secondary Growth- Growing Horizontaly
    Tropism- An involuntary orienting response; positive or negative reaction to a stimulus source

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    4:14 pm
  2. page Stem 2 edited Plant Stems!!! Node- uninsulated spaces between the "beads" of a myelin sheath where…

    Plant Stems!!!
    Node- uninsulated spaces between the "beads" of a myelin sheath where an action potential can be transmitted.
    Internode- the portions of the stem between the nodes
    Bud-undeveloped shoot of a plant
    Vascular Bundle- separate strands of vascular tissue within roots of plants
    Pith-soft spongelike central cylinder of the stems of most flowering plants
    Primary Growth- Growth in vascular plants resulting from the production of primary tissues by a primary meristem. Elongation of the plant body is usually a consequence of primary growth.
    Secondary Growth- Growth in vascular plants from production of secondary tissues by a lateral meristem, usually resulting in wider branches and stems.
    Vascular cambium- A lateral meristem that produces secondary xylem to the inside and secondary phloem to the outside.
    Cork Cambium- A lateral ring of meristematic tissue found in woody seed plants, producing cork on the outside of the ring and parenchyma on the inside of the ring. Also called phellogen.
    Heartwood- The older, nonliving central wood of a tree or woody plant, usually darker and harder than the younger sapwood. Also called duramen.
    Sapwood-The newly formed outer wood located just inside the vascular cambium of a tree trunk and active in the conduction of water. Sapwood is usually lighter in color than heartwood.
    Bark-. The tough outer covering of the woody stems and roots of trees, shrubs, and other woody plants. It includes all tissues outside the vascular cambium.

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    9:28 am
  3. page Roots 2 edited Tap root system The first root produced from a seed is called the radicle. In many dicotyledonous…
    Tap root system
    The first root produced from a seed is called the radicle. In many dicotyledonous plants this root greatly enlarges to become the most prominent root of the plant and is known as a tap root. Many smaller branch roots may grow from the tap root.
    Fibrous root system
    In monocotyledonous plants, the radicle is short lived and is replaced by numerous roots of more or less equal size. These roots are adventitious which means they can grow from plant organs other than roots e.g. stems.
    Primary Root Tissues and Structure
    The organization of tissues in the primary root is simpler than in the primary stem because no leaves are produced on the roots and, consequently, there is no need to connect the vascular system laterally to offshoots. The primary body, produced by the three primary meristems, consists of a central cylinder of vascular tissue, the stelen place, surrounded by large storage parenchyma cells—the cortex—on the outside of which lies a protective layer of cells—the epidermis.
    Root Functions
    -Anchors plant in place
    -Stores excess sugars and absorbs water and minerial nutrients.
    Osmosis is the diffusion of water through a semi-permeable membrane, from a solution of low solute concentration (high water potential) to a solution with high solute concentration (low water potential), up a solute concentration gradient. The simplest definition is that it is diffusion of water across a semipermeable membrane.[1] It is a physical process in which a solvent moves, without input of energy, across a semi-permeable membrane (permeable to the solvent, but not the solute) separating two solutions of different concentrations.[2] Osmosis releases energy, and can be made to do work[3], as when a growing tree root splits a stone.
    {http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/thumb/6/6a/Osmosis.JPG/180px-Osmosis.JPG} {http://en.wikipedia.org/skins-1.5/common/images/magnify-clip.png} Shot of a computer simulation of the process of osmosis
    Net movement of solvent is from the less-concentrated (hypotonic) to the more-concentrated (hypertonic) solution, which tends to reduce the difference in concentrations. This effect can be countered by increasing the pressure of the hypertonic solution, with respect to the hypotonic. The osmotic pressure is defined to be the pressure required to maintain an equilibrium, with no net movement of solvent. Osmotic pressure is a colligative property, meaning that the property depends on the molar concentration of the solute but not on its identity.

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    9:28 am
  4. page Roots 1 edited A plant is held in the soil and takes up water and minerals from the soil through its roots. The…

    A plant is held in the soil and takes up water and minerals from the soil through its roots. The roots of a plant are usually found underground. They carry the water and minerals upward to the stem and transport dissolved food downward from the stem. In addition, the roots of some plants are specialized for food storage. {root_diagram.gif} The taking-in of water and minerals from the soil is the primary function of the epidermis. Many epidermal cells have hairlike extensions that are called root hairs. these rot hairs greatly increase the surface area for the absorbtion of water.
    {Ferticell_Diagram.png}
    T

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    9:28 am
  5. page Vocabulary 2 edited Anther- Pollen bearing structure in the stamen of the flower. Embryo Sac- Large oval cell in nuce…
    Anther- Pollen bearing structure in the stamen of the flower.
    Embryo Sac- Large oval cell in nucellus of an ovule
    Style- An elongated part of the carpel
    Stigma- The pollen receptive surface of a carpel
    Pollination- The transfer of pollen of a anther to a stigma of a flower
    Pollen Tube- Outgrowth of a pollen grain
    Cotyledon- Modified leaf of A SEED PLANT EMBRYO
    Germination- Process by which a dormant seed begins to sprout and grow into a seedling under the right growing conditions
    Vegetative Reproduction- The process in which undifferentiated plant cells first divided mitoticly
    Fiberous Root-
    Taproot- The main descending root of a plant that has a single dominant main stem
    Stem- The leaf bearing structure of vascular plants
    Bud- An immature or undeveloped structure that develops into a bodily structure or a new individual
    Dermal Tissue- Outer skin of a plant
    Vascular Tissue- Xylem and Phloem of a plant
    Xylem- Brings nutrients up the plant
    Phloem- Transports organic material up in a plant
    Ground Tissue- Where photosynthesis takes place

    (view changes)
    9:28 am

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